Razer Releases First 60% Mini Keyboard

Razer releases its hit keyboard, The Huntsman, in mini form.

The Huntsman mini has already launched in its clicky key variation. Supposedly linear switches will be coming soon as well. Most importantly, the keyboard is available in WHITE and black. I have been dying to get a white viper ultimate, but sadly they have not hinted at even producing that at all, such a bummer.

The Huntsman keyboard has been quite popular in the gaming scene, as its optical switches are something new in a stale keyboard market. Everyone that has a huntsman of any variation has raved about it.

Now gamers have the mini 60% option so they can maximize their mousepad space for those low sensitivity flick headshots.

Find the keyboard here

Razer Updates the Ornata Keyboard with Version 2

The unconventional mecha-membrane hybrid keyboard gets an update.

The Ornata keyboard has kept its place as a very niche product. Most enthusiasts have transitioned into mechanical keyboards, but some subset of users still prefer the slightly dampened feeling of a membrane keyboard. The Ornata has been a favorite among those set of users, providing keys that provide tactile feedback, but still have some bounce to them. The keycaps are also quite slick, featuring something closer to a mid height setup.

Razer finally released an update which is simply called the Ornata V2

Check out the Oranata V2 reveal

I’ve felt this keyboard myself and found it very pleasant to type on. The shorter keycaps feel great and the tactile click is every bit as good as a real mechanical keyboard; I personally don’t like the “bottom out” feeling of mechanicals and usually place O-rings on my keyboards. So the Ornata strikes a perfect balance between membrane and mechanical.

Those that I’ve spoken to that own this keyboard also rave about it as well. It is also not obnoxiously loud, which sometimes can be a huge selling point.

Razer is also committed to shipping quickly, which is very reassuring as I’m still dealing with other products/companies I’ve ordered during this pandemic that are still stuck in limbo, months later.

You can find the keyboard here.

Razer’s New Gigantus V2 Mouse Pad

Can this really be called a mouse pad? Maybe a DESK pad?

Razer is always pumping out new and interesting accessories. The latest announcement is a refresh of their Gigantus mouse pad, called the V2. They’re taking “Gigantus” to the next level with 4 different sizes.

  • M – 14.17 x 10.83 inches – $9.99
  • L – 17.72 x 15.75 inches – $14.99
  • XXL – 37 x 16.14 inches – $29.99
  • 3XL – 47.24 x 21.65 inches – $49.99

I’ve recently acquired a large style “mouse pad” that my keyboard currently sits on as well. It has been pretty enjoyable, the extra cushion from the mouse pad is comfortable when I am typing and/or using my mouse. There is also little risk of ever running out of mouse pad surface area when flicking around for those headshots.

The new Gigantus lineup throws more into the mix with pads that can cover just about the entire desk. I’m not sure how this would play out, I’m not sure why I would need my monitor or my speakers to sit on a pad as well. You would also need to consider that cleaning a mouse pad is harder than just wiping down your desk.

Still, it is fun to see Razer always trying new things. They will also offer their Razer Customs service on certain sizes, so you can design your pad as well to your liking. The feature should be available soon on their customs page.

Razer’s New 300hz Blade Pro

Are 300 Hz displays and 10th gen Intel processors enough to get consumers to pick up the Razer Blade Pro 17?

That’s what the company hopes and they’re throwing everything but the kitchen sink at the project in order to woo the often fickle PC consumer back to Razer.

A notch above the Blade Stealth and Blade, the Blade Pro 17 is the one with the big 17 inch screen and it comes in three hot configurations that are all ready to burn a hole through your wallet.

These are the $2,599.99, $3,199.99, and $3,799.99 version with the cheapest variant rocking the Nvidia GeForce RTX 2070 Max-Q and the middle-tier and top-tier iterations use the Nvidia GeForce RTX 2080 Super Max-Q.

All share the same CPU, a Intel Core i7-10875H, and 16GB DDR4 RAM. The models also share the same battery, a 70.5 WHr, and the same wireless Intel AX201 Wi-Fi 6, Bluetooth 5.0.

The cheapest and middle versions of the Blade Pro 17 use a 512GB PCIe NVMe SSD for storage while the top-of-the-line model uses a 1TB PCIe NVME SSD.

The Razer Marketing Video of Razer Blade Pro 17

When it comes to the display, the Blade Pro 17 truly distinguishes each model from one another with different variants geared towards gamers who really care about this kind of thing.

The cheapest and middle versions of the computer come with a 17.3-inch, 1920 x 1080, 300 Hz display while the most expensive version has a 17.3-inch, 4K, 120Hz.

Basically, the display is pretty amazing at any level. But that’s also where we had our biggest issues with the product. More on that later.

To round out the Blade Pro 17’s list of features, you get an SD card reader, 3 USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-A ports, RJ45 Ethernet,  HDMI, Thunderbolt 3, and  2 USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C ports.

The Razer Blade Pro 17 should start shipping to consumers and retail outlets later this month. In our opinion, it’s a pretty solid offering and we think the specs justify themselves.

The prices are also not uncommon for this kind of laptop and we didn’t really expect Razer to engage in intense price competition. What we did expect were the specs and the display, in particular, and that’s where we are concerned.

Can a gaming laptop consistently maintain 300 Hz over its lifetime?

We doubt it. Thermal throttling should become an issue because that’s a ton of power just to the display alone without even considering the rest of the power-hungry components that make up this system.

Outside of that, though, we’re impressed. If the system holds up when it starts to be subjected to real world conditions across multiple users, then we’ll change our mind but, for now, we’re cautiously optimistic.

Some people might take a wait-and-see approach as a verdict to not buy the product but, really, we just want to make sure its capable of delivering on the promises it is making.